Hamburg

Home  /  Hamburg

blog image

Hamburg

Friday July 9th, 2021  /
  • 306
  • 34
  • 122

Hamburg, city and Land (state), located on the Elbe River in northern Germany. It is the country’s largest port and commercial centre.

The Free and Hanseatic City (Freie und Hansestadt) of Hamburg is the second smallest of the 16 Länder of Germany, with a territory of only 292 square miles (755 square km). It is also the most populous city in Germany after Berlin and has one of the largest and busiest ports in Europe. The official name, which covers both the Land and the town, reflects Hamburg’s long tradition of particularism and self-government. Hamburg and Bremen (the smallest of the Länder) are, in fact, the only German city-states that still keep something of their medieval independence. The characteristic individuality of Hamburg has been proudly maintained by its people so that, in many spheres of public and private life, the city’s culture has retained its uniqueness and has not succumbed to the general trend of standardization.

Experience and discover the beautiful city on the waterfront

Hamburg is one of the most beautiful cities in the world and radiates an incomparable charm. Go on a discovery tour through the city by the Elbe and explore the most beautiful sights, attend unique events or feast in the most delicious restaurants & cafés. The city’s scene & nightlife are known all over the world and Hamburg is also a great shopping metropolis. When are you coming?

One of the most important harbours in Europe and the world, Hamburg takes great pride in its mercantile background, which built the city’s wealth in the past centuries. From 1241 on, it was member of the Hanseatic League, a medieval trade monopoly across Northern Europe. In the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, millions left Europe on their way to the new world through the Hamburg harbour. Today, the harbour ranks second in Europe and eleventh world-wide. Consequently, one of Hamburg’s tag lines is “The Gateway to the World” (derived from the city’s coat of arms, showing a white city wall with a gate and crowned by three towers on a red background). Hamburg is known to be one of the richest metropolitan area in the European Union, in the company of Brussels and London.

The harbor is the heart of the city, however, Hamburg is also one of the most important media hubs in Germany. Half of the nation’s newspapers and magazines have their roots in Hamburg. And, unknown even to some locals, is the fact that, with one of the Airbus aircraft assembly plants, Hamburg is a major location of the world’s aerospace industry, right after Seattle (USA) and Toulouse (France).

The mercantile background reflects in the city’s architecture. The most notable palace in Hamburg is the town hall, which houses the citizen’s parliament and the senate. The only other palace of the city is located in the urban district of Bergedorf. Apart from that, the city has a few impressive mansions in public parks and still has large quarters with expensive houses and villas. These residences were home to merchants and captains, surrounded by lots of greenery. Large parts of the city were destroyed during the devastating air raids of World War II, particularly the port and some residential areas, killing tens of thousands and leaving more than a million homeless, yet much of historic value has been preserved, although not as much as people would have wished for, as like many German cities,it’s cursed by horrible post war buildings and disgusting office blocks.

Hamburg still keeps its tradition of being an open, yet discreet city. Citizens of Hamburg, just like most Northern Germans, may appear to be quite reserved at first. Once they get to know with whom they are dealing, they’ll be as warm and friendly as you’d wish.

The people of Hamburg are known as “Hamburger” (pronounce the a like you’re saying “ah”, and it won’t sound as silly). The beef patties on a bun were named after this city, where presumably they were invented. See also “frankfurter” (Frankfurt) and “wiener” (Wien, aka Vienna).

A virtual guide to the German Federal State of Hamburg. The Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (in German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg) is a city state and the second largest city in Germany and the second smallest Federal State in Germany.

Formerly a settlement to convert the Saxons to Christianity in the 8th century, the ancient riverport became in the course of centuries the most important trading center in Europe and Germany’s ‘Gateway to the World’.

Hamburg is located at the junction of the Elbe River with the Alster and Bille Rivers about 50 km south east of the Elbe River’s estuary mouth on the North Sea. The city state borders Schleswig-Holstein in north and Lower-Saxony in south. Hamburg is Germany’s largest and most important port.

The city layout

The nucleus of the city is the Altstadt (Old Town), the former medieval settlement, bounded by the harbour and by a string of roads that follow the line of the old fortifications. Within this core there are few great buildings to remind the visitor of the city’s thousand-year history apart from the five principal churches—Sankt Jacobi, Sankt Petri, Sankt Katharinen, Sankt Nikolai, and Sankt Michaelis—and none of these is in its original condition. Fire has destroyed almost all the older residences and warehouses, and what was left untouched by conflagration has often been rebuilt for contemporary purposes. There are, however, a few scattered survivals of older buildings. Moreover, the layout of the old city centre can still be detected in some of the ancient street names and in the Fleete (canals), which connect the Alster with the docks on the Elbe. One of the best views of the inner city is to be enjoyed from the Lombardsbrücke (Lombard Bridge), whence the towers of the five churches can be seen rising high against a skyline that is still relatively harmonious despite the presence of modern skyscrapers.

At the heart of Hamburg is a lake, measuring 455 acres (184 hectares), formed by the damming of the Alster and divided by the Lombardsbrücke into the Binnenalster (Inner Alster) and the Aussenalster (Outer Alster). Around the latter are elegant suburbs such as Rotherbaum, Harvesterhude, and Uhlenhorst. Many waterways, navigable by pleasure boats, run into the Aussenalster.

RSS
Follow by Email
YouTube
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Share
WhatsApp